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Strategy & Tactics Briefing Room The Gallipoli Campaign and First Punic War

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The Gallipoli Campaign

By John D. Burt

The genesis of the Gallipoli Campaign was the western front as it became a troop-devouring stalemate at the end of 1914. In Britain alternative approaches came from the Admiralty, led at the time by Winston Churchill. He proposed several options he believed would be better than continuing to “chew barbed wire in Flanders.” Not surprisingly, he emphasized the use of Britain’s strongest military asset—the Royal Navy.

He initially favored taking one of the small islands off Germany’s northwest coast, which would allow for the establishment of a base from which to maintain a close-in blockade. It would also provide a jump-off point for further operations into the Baltic once the German fleet had come out—as it would have to do in the face of such a move—and been destroyed in a huge engagement. The army high command under Lord Horatio Kitchener would not support the idea, however, because it did not allow that service a share of the glory.

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The First Punic War

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Articles:

  • The First Punic War: A Strategic Analysis: For 24 years the Carthaginian Empire engaged the Roman Republic in a conflict that became known as the First Punic War (264–41 BC). While the Second Punic War (218–01 BC) is better known, the earlier war laid the foundation for Rome’s dominance.
  • The Gallipoli Campaign, Part 1: A Strategic & Operational Analysis: The genesis of the Gallipoli campaign was the western front as it became a troop-devouring stalemate at the end of 1914. In Britain alternative approaches came from the Admiralty, led at the time by Winston Churchill. He proposed several options he believed would be better than continuing to “chew barbed wire in Flanders.”
  • Taking Up the Hatchet: Pontiac’s War, 1763–1764: An indigenous religious movement spread among frontier Indian settlements in the early 1760s when Neolin, a self-declared prophet, claimed God told him there was to be a spiritual renaissance that would free all the native tribes of white influence. Pontiac, an Ottawa chief, shrewdly incorporated that message into his own speeches calling for war “to wipe out the English.”
  • America’s Undeclared War with Libya: 1981–89: US President Ronald Reagan had no patience with Libyan strongman Muammar Gaddafi and his Soviet-supported, terrorist-sponsoring regime. Shortly after taking office, Reagan determined to take a hardline with Gaddafi. That resulted in a decade of undeclared, on-again off-again war between the two nations.

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